Tag Archives: star trek

Michelle Yeoh goes where no Asian actor has gone before

24 Nov

yeoh-tomorrow-never-dies

Michelle Yeoh will play a prominent role as a starship captain in the upcoming series Star Trek: Discovery

I’ve known about this for weeks from a personal friend of Michelle Yeoh but swore to keep it a secret. Now that the news is finally public, we can finally talk about the significance of Malaysia-born actress Michelle Yeoh’s debut as a starship captain in the upcoming series Star Trek: Discovery.

First. Asian. Woman. In a major television and film franchise show like Star Trek! This breaks all kinds of barriers and it’s a major victory for Asian actors.

The world of scifi and fantasy has been under fire lately because of charges of “white-washing” of major roles that should have gone to Asian actors: Tilda Swinton as The Ancient One in Doctor Strange and Scarlett Johansson as the Major in Ghost In the Shell being among the most prominent.

Another recent controversy arose from the casting of Finn Jones as the lead for Marvel’s Iron Fist Netflix series. I defended this decision on two counts: first, the original comic book Iron Fist was always a white male, Danny Rand, and second, I didn’t believe that casting an Asian actor to play Iron Fist would have helped the diversity cause in any way. An Asian actor playing a kung fu / martial artist superhero doesn’t open up new opportunities for Asian talent. Asians playing lawyers, cops, next door neighbors, schoolteachers, love interests…that’s true diversity.

But now…an Asian starship captain? And a woman? That is a major step forward. For Asian actors Yeoh’s casting is, in many ways…the Final Frontier.

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Why I hated Star Trek: Into Darkness

19 May

JJ Abrams takes my best memories of Star Trek and then shits all over them in his latest movie

The Enterprise in ruin: a fitting image to accompany this review.

I went to see Star Trek: Into Darkness with much trepidation. JJ Abrams’ first Star Trek film, although pretty decent, was not one of my favorites in the series. In the lead up to Darkness, I was anxious about how the trailers and promotional materials bore little resemblance to the Star Trek I remember. I was bracing myself for a brainless, blockbuster summer action film … and STID did not disappoint.

And that’s exactly the problem. Star Trek was never brainless action material. As a long time follower of the series, I feel like JJ Abrams has taken my favorite Star Trek memories — in particular, scenes from the franchise’s best film, The Wrath of Khan — and taken a giant, steaming, $190 million shit on them.

I’m going to put aside the inconsistencies and the plot holes so big you could fly a Constitution-class starship through them to zero in on Into Darkness‘s core issue: this movie has no soul.

The Star Trek I know asked questions about our place in the universe. It took critical looks at how we treat one another as a species. It reminded us of the consequences of our actions. And it explored the possibilities of science and the vastness of the universe we live in. It was not about laser beams and explosions strung together with occasional witty one-liners. But most importantly, Star Trek — through all its incarnations over the years — was about the relationships between a special group of people who could always find courage and come together to overcome adversity.

That doesn’t mean to say that Star Trek shouldn’t have any action in it. Star Trek‘s most successful films The Wrath of Khan, The Undiscovered Country and First Contact all saw their fair share of action (and blockbuster box office returns). But even the most fast-paced action movies need good storytelling and character development. Into Darkness has neither. Worse of all, Abrams disrespects the franchise because he ignores nearly 50 years of lore and tradition by not delving deeper into the characters’ relationships.

SPOILER ALERT

Most of all, you never get the chance to empathize with the central character: James T Kirk. Chris Pine’s Kirk is a complete dickhead. He is reckless, never follows orders or procedures and is fired from his job as Captain of the Enterprise in the first 20 minutes of the film. Does he show any remorse? Does he reflect on his decisions that put his entire crew at risk and cost him his job? No! Instead, he remains indignant and blames everything on Spock.

Throughout the film, you never get a sense of progress in the relationship between Kirk and Spock, a hallmark of the original series. (This is a shame since Zachary Quinto’s performance is one of the few good things about the film.) On the contrary, you are constantly reminded of how much they dislike each other. Suddenly, in what should have been the most dramatic moment in the film, Kirk sacrifices himself to save the ship (a reverse version of the events famously played out in Wrath of Khan) and suddenly Spock is disproportionately grief-stricken. (“What? They were friends?”)

The rest of the characters are simply wasted. Simon Pegg as Scotty is relegated to providing comic relief. Anton Yelchin as Chekov is constantly frantic and stressed out about … something. And Karl Urban as McCoy is reduced to spouting cliches, like a standup comic attempting a tired “Bones” impersonation. This is another huge waste as Kirk’s relationship with McCoy is one of the richest and most meaningful in the original series.

And what exactly was the point of this scene?

There is a new crew member, Carol Marcus, whose role is to look good with her clothes off and sound British (even when her father is clearly American). Benedict Cumberbatch plays a good Khan but, again, we never get the chance to really hate him. Is he a villain or is he just a captain trying to protect his crew? It doesn’t matter because there are too many phaser beams zipping past and spaceships exploding all over the place.

Most people who never followed the original TV series, their movies, or The Next Generation, etc all seem to enjoy it: big, loud special effects, fast-paced action, a good looking cast … what’s not to like?

Except, it’s not Star Trek. At least, not the one I know and love.

Gene Roddenberry (1921-1991), creator of Star Trek

Gene Roddenberry (1921-1991), creator of Star Trek

Fans rally to resurrect Firefly

25 Feb

Nathan Fillion, star of Castle (and, of course, Firefly) said in a recent interview that if he had the money, he would buy the rights to the Firefly TV series and produce it himself.  Seven days later, more than 70,000 fans have rallied behind Help Nathan Buy Firefly.

Firefly fans and online communities from all over the world are joining the movement, including some former Firefly writers.

If you love Firefly and want to see ol’ Serenity fly again, join the community on Facebook and / or Twitter. Or visit the helpnathanbuyfirefly.com website.

Is this a practical joke, just another giant love-in for Firefly fans or a serious fan movement than could bring Joss Whedon’s cult favorite back from the dead? (Let’s not forget a similar movement decades ago resurrected Star Trek, which went on to spawn four new TV series and 11 feature films.)

This may all be a dream … but it’s a nice dream. Aren’t dreams worth fighting for?